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Interview with the Young Wolf: 10-Time World Champion Tim Weissman

Tim "Young Wolf" Weissman

Tim “Young Wolf” Weissman

Two weeks ago two-time World Champion Wil Upchurch described a pivotal moment in his development when he was confronted by 90s pop sensation Seal and air hockey wunderkind Tim Weissman in the parking lot of a Houston gameroom in 1991. Only one person has won more air hockey World Championships than Tim Weissman—the mercurial Jesse Douty, who won eleven titles back in the air hockey Stone Age (the late 70s and early 80s). But few can dispute that Weissman took air hockey to a whole new level after dispatching Douty permanently. Weissman pioneered radical offensive and defensive playing styles that dominated competitive play from the late 80s to the mid-90s.

Many say that the best air hockey ever played was played by Tim Weissman back in the early 90s. Like many things in air hockey, of course, this claim is in dispute. But no one can argue that Weissman wasn’t the most revolutionary air hockey player of all time, when one looks at the level of play before and after his reign.

Previously, my cousin’s 11-year-old son, Henry, conducted an interview with current World Champion Davis Lee Huynh. We were delighted to hear that Henry’s interest in air hockey continues, and that he expressed a desire to ask some questions to 10-time World Champion Tim Weissman.

As before, I corrected some grammar and spelling but the questions are his. Here they are.

HENRY: Do you like Texas?

Tim will ruin your day with his Circle Drift and Out Defense

Tim will ruin your day with his Circle Drift and Out Defense

TIM: I love Texas!  I’ve traveled around the country quite a bit as an adult and honestly, I have not found any other state with as much to offer.  We have mountains, forests, rivers, ocean, desert, plains, large cities, small towns…  It is over 700 miles from the east tip to the west tip.  Plus, the American spirit is still alive and well down here.  We don’t have an income tax, and the government is still friendly to business.  But, above all that, we have the best air hockey players in the World. Sure, we have seen a few “decent” players come from other places, but nothing close to the amount of talent which has spawned from the Lone Star state!

HENRY: Are you the best air hockey player in history? The movie says you are.

TIM: Well, if a movie says it, it must be true.  In all seriousness though, I think I am one of the best, but I can’t claim to be the best.  I don’t think anyone has ever held a tighter grip during their reign than I did back in the early 1990’s.  I won 9 consecutive World Championships and 28 major championships in a row over 5 years.  But, I was pushing the envelope and folks had never seen many of the techniques I was using, such as the Circle Drift, quick release and the true “out” defense.  Once those became part of the culture of the sport, people caught up and we have seen some phenomenal players since that time.  Danny Hynes and Wil Upchurch, at their primes, were pure freaks of nature on the Table, unleashing offensive onslaughts never seen before!

HENRY: Tell me your SECRET. And don’t say “practice”.

Give way or be crushed

Give way or be crushed

TIM: Obsession.  When I was on my 5-year winning streak, I ate, drank, slept, dreamed, imagined, thought, felt, inhaled and lived air hockey. I maintained the killer instinct in each and every tournament. When I was ahead in a game 6-1, and only needed a single point to win, I had the  thought in the back of my head that I was in imminent danger of losing and had to push hard to finish my opponent off.  I constantly felt that I was on the edge and could lose at any moment.  It was when I started losing that edge, that hunger,the streak came to a close.  I would go so far as to say that this is a good secret for any aspect of one’s life where you want to succeed or be the best.  Certainly, you don’t want to lose yourself in your endeavors, but without a pure and real fire in your belly, it is hard to be great.

HENRY: Who has the craziest playing style in history?

TIM: Randy Lind, hands down. Oh, you said craziest style, not craziest person. Just kidding Randy!  His style is very off-the-wall.  He plays with a mallet attached to each hand, and he switches between them as he executes his attack. It can be very deceptive to newer players, but ultimately, I think when you have too much going on, you confuse yourself on a certain level.  I am a big believer in keeping it simple.  That’s part of what makes the Circle Drift so effective.  It is very basic and simple on the surface, but from it, there derives infinite possibilities.

HENRY: Did you ever lose and feel really bad? When was that?

TIM: Every time I lose, I feel really really bad.  Losing sucks.  Even in my life today, I experience losses of various kinds.  But, I learned some amazing life lessons from my experiences of loss in Air Hockey.  First, and foremost, I learned that I hate to lose!  And, that winning feels just so much better!  But, more importantly, I learned that I never really understood how great it is to win until I really knew what it was like to have lost.  It gave me a richer appreciation for winning, and it helped me stay humble.  I also learned that losing is just a step toward winning.

When we lose, we look at what happened and analyze.  We find out what contributed to that loss and how we can overcome that obstacle in the future.

HENRY: Do you make your children play air hockey? How old are they?

The young Young Wolf with bowl cut and 1000-yard stare

The young Young Wolf with bowl cut and 1000-yard stare

I have a 14-year-old boy, 10-year-old girl, 5-year-old boy and a 1-year-old boy.  My children are required to play 5 hours of air hockey each and every day!  Actually, the older ones play because they enjoy it.  They are always begging me to practice with them.  Most of the time, I am too tired from a long work day.  Jacob, my oldest, won his age division at this last World Junior Championships.  He is much better than I was at 14, but then again, I didn’t have a Table in my garage or a World Champion to teach me.  My daughter is getting pretty good too and has a mean right-wall.

I’m glad you asked about children and air hockey though, because I do want to say that the only way I see air hockey ever growing beyond where it has been in the last 30 years is by involving children.  Arcades and game rooms are pretty much a thing of the past, so where do we get our new players now? This question must be resolved for air hockey to make a leap forward.  I have an answer, and I plan to try some pilot programs with the support of Mark Robbins and his new air hockey manufacturing company, Shelti, in days to come.

HENRY: How long can you hold your breath?

TIM: Funny you should ask…I actually have pretty decent lungs. I can stay underwater for around 1 min 30 seconds, give or take.  One of my other interests is swimming. There is nothing more peaceful than swimming underwater across an Olympic size pool.  It’s a great warm-up before a championship air hockey match!

The Young Wolf, mellowed with age

The Young Wolf, mellowed with age


Thanks, Tim!

Tim has a large rambunctious family and a large rambunctious array of interests. In addition to earning a Ph.D. in counseling psychology, Tim has been the owner of a special events company since 1996 and the owner of a Fish Window Cleaning franchise since 2008. His website is:


Interview With Thien Pham, Author of ‘Air’, the First and Only Air Hockey Minicomic

Author Thien Pham

Author Thien Pham

One of the great pleasures of making Way of the Puck has been discovering air hockey’s unexpected—but far-reaching—influence in the arts, sciences, and popular culture. Air hockey won’t really go away; it’s connected to math and music and robotics and a hundred other disciplines.

In honor of Comic-Con we decided to publish an interview with Thien Pham, a minicomics artist we met at the Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco. Thien is the author of Air, a one-off comic book (graphic novella?) about “life, love, and air hockey.”

WOTP: Why did you decide to make Air?

The Masterwork

The Masterwork

THIEN: At first I was thinking about doing a foosball comic. There are many similarities to playing foosball and doing cartooning… the small communities are really passionate. But I thought a more fast-paced  and one-on-one-type sport would be better, so I decided to try an air hockey comic. And I assumed that because there’s pro foosball and darts, there had to be professional air hockey. Lo and behold, they’ve held tournaments at this place in San Jose by my house this whole time! So I went to one and I was totally blown away by it. I just thought it was so amazing, so I said, “Okay, I gotta do this!”

WOTP: What’s it about?

THIEN: I always describe it as an 80s movie. One of the inspirations for this was the arm wrestling movie, Over the TopAir is about a guy whose dad was a pro air hockey player and got injured playing. So this guy, his son, was really good himself, but he kind of quit playing for various reasons—work and girlfriend being two of them. At the end he decides that doing what you love is the most important thing, so he decides to pursue air hockey again and actually plays his rival, the guy who injured his father.

WOTP: So there’s a love interest?

THIEN: Well, there’s an implied love interest. He plays with air hockey with another girl, and at that point they connect because they have this thing in common, but I think I just left it up in the air whether or not he’s actually in love. The love part is actually about air hockey itself, doing what you love. Not so much as falling in love with somebody.

Do you want to play a game?

Do you want to play a game?

In the story one of the reasons why the guy quits air hockey is because his girlfriend thinks it’s a waste of time and that he should be out there making more money. It’s not a relationship that I’ve ever experienced but basically I was trying to play off the experience I’ve had with my parents—how they feel about comics and foosball… that it’s just child’s play and not a worthy activity.

It’s also represents the perception people have about our little communities. I always imagine that people who are on the outside doing jobs, climbing up in business or whatever, would look at a community of air hockey players or minicomic artists and kind of say they are just wasting their time.

But I think if you love doing it you shouldn’t stop. It’s the thing you should do. So that’s what the girl represents.

WOTP: What are some other similarities between minicomics and air hockey?

THIEN: When I told my friends who I play foos with about minicomics they were all like: “That’s weird… a bunch of people that get together and draw comics and photocopy them?” And then when I told my comic friends about air hockey people, they said: “Whooooa. There’s actually people that get together and play pro air hockey?”

That was so funny to me because all these little groups—these small communities—are really family oriented and think other groups (who are exactly the same) are weird. Just because it’s not an activity that they are used to!

And I notice it’s not just air hockey or foosball or minicomics, but any type of mini- or small community has these same parallels, whether it’s racecars or bikes or skateboarding. It’s all about the same kinds of things.

WOTP: So what is it that draws you to these activities?

Dude, you didn't get that right...

Dude, you didn’t get that right…

THIEN: I like the fact that it’s a small group of people doing something really specific and something that they really love. And the parallels are perfect. There are guys that are good and guys that aren’t so good but talk like they’re good. Just like in comics there are artists you respect, artists you hate, guys that do comics you can’t stand, in air hockey there are guys who have shots you don’t really like, or they just have an annoying playing style, or whatever.

WOTP: Has there been any response from the air hockey community?

THIEN: My favorite things ever have been the emails I got from air hockey players. It’s my favorite fan mail, by far. I never thought for a million years that any people who played pro air hockey would read this comic. But then I was also kind of worried that real air hockey players would be like, “Dude, you didn’t get that right. Or that’s not right.” But they’ve been really really nice and supportive of the book.

I was planning on doing another one, a follow-up, because a lot of people have been asking me. So if I ever do that I’ll get all of the air hockey details dead on!

Here are some awesome Thien Pham links, if you are interested!

Thien Pham Fan Club

Facebook | Thien Pham


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